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Allegany Soil Conservation District


11602 Bedford Road, NE ?Cumberland, MD 21502
(301) 777-1747, ext. 4

Responsibilities
The Allegany Soil Conservation District serves one of three mountainous counties in Western Maryland. The narrow mountain ridges, separated by steep valleys, present unique challenges for controlling runoff and erosion. The Allegany Soil Conservation District addresses three major program areas—agriculture, surface mining (coal) and urban development. Once the leading industries in the area, agriculture and surface mining have declined in recent years. Currently, the staffing arrangement can handle these program areas adequately. Conversely, the district's urban program work load has increased steadily. Severe flooding during the past several years has caused the District to focus on stream channel and streambank restoration programs. The district has been successful in acquiring grants from nontraditional sources to implement stream restoration projects in several watersheds, and will continue to seek grant monies to implement additional stream restoration projects over the next several years.

2005 Priorities
1. Complete soil conservation and water quality plans for farms as part of the state's nonpoint-source pollution control goals.

2. Provide timely review and inspection of erosion and sediment control plans and stormwater management plans.

3. Promote the Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program and the Maryland Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program to help farmers pay to install BMPs to protect the environment.

4. Implement stream restoration projects in the Braddock Run, Jennings Run, and George's Creek watersheds to address aspects of Maryland's Tributary Strategies and the Clean Water Act.

5. Assist the Maryland Bureau of Mines in implementing erosion and sediment control practices on surface mine sites.



Anne Arundel Soil Conservation District

2662 Riva Road, Suite 150 ?Annapolis, MD 21401 ?
(410) 222-7822

Responsibilities
The responsibilities of the Anne Arundel Soil Conservation District are divided equally between urban and agricultural interests. The district's agricultural programs are geared toward developing and implementing Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans to protect the environment. These plans include best management practices (BMPs) to protect water quality, reduce soil erosion and control nutrients and pesticides. On the urban front, the district reviews and approves erosion and sediment control plans for developers and various county departments, state projects in the Severn River watershed and the City of Annapolis. Approvals for sand and gravel operations and reclamation facilities also fall under the district's purview.  In addition, the district works in cooperation with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources on shore erosion control matters, small pond approvals and nontidal wetlands issues.

2005 Priorities
1. Promote up-to-date soil conservation and water quality plans for county farmland and emphasize the need for nutrient management.

2. Provide timely, in-depth reviews and approvals of grading permits, subdivisions, petitions and sediment control and stormwater management plans.

3. Maintain an updated agricultural inventory for use in contacting potential cooperators.

4. Increase public awareness of the need for sound natural resources management.

5. Promote the Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program and USDA Farm Service Agency cost-share programs that help farmers install BMPs.

6. Host an agricultural awareness day.
 



Baltimore County Soil Conservation District

9831 Van Buren Lane ?Cockeysville, MD 21030 ?
(410) 666-1188, ext. 3

Responsibilities
The Baltimore County Soil Conservation District serves all of Baltimore County, an area encompassing roughly 380,700 acres. Of this acreage, 40 percent is classified as urban, while 60 percent is zoned agricultural. The district assists the county's urban interests by reviewing and approving erosion and sediment control plans, stormwater management plans and small pond plans. On the agricultural front, dairy, beef and poultry operations are giving way to grain, vegetable and small fruit producers. The commercial horticulture industry—which includes greenhouses, nurseries and tree farms—is also growing rapidly. The district assists the agricultural community by developing Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans (SCWQPs) featuring a range of best management practices to protect the environment. There are three reservoirs located in the county which provide water for six surrounding counties and Baltimore City. Developing SCWQPs for farms in these watersheds featuring buffer strips, manure storage facilities and other best management practices is a high priority for district staff. The district also takes an active role in Chesapeake Bay programs, including Maryland's Tributary Strategies, and works cooperatively with the Critical Area Commission.

2005 Priorities
1. Develop and implement Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans to protect the environment.

2. Develop an effective information and education program emphasizing conservation of natural resources.

3. Provide timely reviews of stormwater management, small pond and erosion and sediment control plans.

4. Continue to work with federal, state and local agencies on the Tributary Strategies, Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Law and Water Quality Improvement Act.

5. Continue efforts to improve water quality in Baltimore County's three reservoirs and the Deer Creek Priority Watershed.



Caroline Soil Conservation District

640 Legion Road, Suite 3 ?Denton, MD 21629 ?
(410) 479-1202, ext. 3

Responsibilities
Located on Maryland's Eastern Shore, the Caroline Soil Conservation District serves a predominantly agricultural region. Farming operations include dairy, swine, beef and a growing poultry industry. Grain farms, however, dominate the landscape. Approximately 80 percent of the county's land drains into the Choptank River, while another 20 percent lies in the Nanticoke River watershed. Implementing Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans featuring a range of  best management practices to protect the environment and promoting the Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program are chief priorities for the district's technical staff. Drainage is also a major concern for district staff, who help farmers manage water in existing drainage systems. Caroline has more organized drainage associations than any other district in Maryland. On the urban front, the district also reviews erosion and sediment control plans.

2005 Priorities
1. Work with farmers and other landowners to control erosion and manage nutrients and pesticides to help maintain ground and surface water quality.

2. Provide technical assistance to Public Drainage Associations.

3. Evaluate and update existing Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans.

4. Maintain a computer data base for resource management.

5. Review erosion and sediment control plans.

6. Help farmers comply with Maryland's nutrient management regulations.
 



Carroll Soil Conservation District

1004 Littlestown Pike, Suite B-2 ?Westminster, MD 21157 ?
(410) 848-8200, ext. 3

Responsibilities
The Carroll Soil Conservation District serves all of Carroll County—an area encompassing roughly 300,000 acres. Approximately 30,000 acres are committed to residential development, while 173,000 acres are classified as agricultural.  Carroll County is one of the leading agricultural regions in Maryland. Large numbers of livestock are maintained in the district, including poultry, dairy and beef cattle, horses, hogs and sheep. The cumulative impact of agricultural runoff, urban erosion and increased population has raised concerns about water quality in the county. To address these concerns, the district provides technical assistance to the agricultural community, reviews and approves erosion and sediment control plans for construction activities and promotes the use of best management practices (BMPs) to protect water quality.

2005 Priorities
1. Develop Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans and provide assistance to landowners to install best management practices. Emphasis will be placed on new cooperators and livestock operations.

2. Implement the environmental provisions of the Farm Bill and promote and/or implement a range of local, state and federal programs including the Carroll County Land Preservation and Rural Legacy Programs, the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, the Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program and the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998.

4. Review and approve erosion and sediment control plans.

5. Provide a conservation equipment rental program for farmers and a tree seedling sale for the community.

6. Coordinate the Envirothon Program for high school students.
 



Catoctin Soil Conservation District

92 Thomas Johnson Drive, Suite 230 North Amber ?Frederick, MD 21702 ?
(301) 695-2803, ext. 3

Responsibilities
The Catoctin Soil Conservation District serves Frederick County west of the Catoctin Mountains, including the fertile Middletown Valley. Dairy operations dominate the region, but there are a number of grain, beef and poultry operations, as well. Developing Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans, stream buffer protection programs and manure storage facilities are primary functions of the district's technical staff. The Catoctin Soil Conservation District shares office space and staff with the Frederick Soil Conservation District.

2005 Priorities
1. Target priority watersheds to implement nutrient reductions for Maryland's Tributary strategies.

2. Pursue funding for a nutrient management consultant for the Catoctin Soil Conservation District to provide additional assistance with nutrient management planning and agricultural waste management.

3. Support the Western Maryland Resource Conservation and Development Board.

4. Promote the use of winter cover crops to tie up unused nutrients.
 



Cecil Soil Conservation District

105 Chesapeake Blvd., Suite B-3 ?Elkton, MD 21921 ?
(410) 398-4411, ext. 3

Responsibilities
The Cecil Soil Conservation District is located in the northeast corner of the state and is bounded on the west by the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay. The topography of the region varies from the nearly level Atlantic Coast Plain in the south to the rolling hills of the Piedmont Plateau in the north. Commercial agriculture is the county's largest industry, with dairy, beef, horses, swine, poultry, corn, soybeans, small grain, nursery stock and orchards as the primary products. Developing Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans is a major function of the district. The main focus of district staff is to assist with the design and installation of best management practices (BMPs), including grassed filter strips, waterways, grade stabilization structures, animal waste storage structures, spring developments, stream crossings and stream buffers. The district promotes nutrient management, cover crops and land preservation, and is responsible for the review of all erosion and sediment control plans. The district also handles the Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program, the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program Conservation Reserve Program, Environmental Quality Incentives Program and other related government efforts.

2005 Priorities
1. Develop and implement Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans for county farms.

2. Provide technical assistance and administrate cost-share programs for the installation of BMPs.

3. Work cooperatively with the private sector and Maryland Cooperative Extension to educate
the public and promote nutrient management.

4. Review erosion and sediment control plans and stormwater management plans. Provide additional technical assistance to county agencies.

5. Promote the conservation of natural resources through a dynamic information and education outreach program.

6. Help farmers comply with Maryland's nutrient management regulations.


 



Charles Soil Conservation District

101 Catalpa Drive, Suite 106C ?LaPlata, MD 20646 ?
(301) 934-9588, ext. 3

Responsibilities
The Charles Soil Conservation District serves an area that is changing rapidly from rural gricultural to suburban residential, commercial and industrial land uses. The Potomac and Patuxent rivers border the district in the west, south and east, and are the focus of multi-agency cleanup programs. Although the district's main priority is to provide the agricultural community with technical assistance to conserve valuable soil and water resources, development pressures have generated an increased work load. More than 60 percent of the land area of the county remains forested.

2005 Priorities
1. Develop Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans for farms in the Lower Potomac River Basin. Help landowners implement the plans.

2. Provide timely reviews of urban erosion/sediment control plans.

3. Complete soil survey update.

4. Plan and coordinate the Envirothon Program for high school students and expand conservation education activities.

5. Promote awareness of financial assistance programs including the Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share (MACS) Program, Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP), Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP).

6. Boost efforts to identify and correct pollution caused by agricultural livestock operations.

7. Revise district's long-range plan.

Newsletter, May 2005
Newsletter, February 2005

 



Dorchester Soil Conservation District

501 Court Lane ?Cambridge, MD 21613 ?
(410) 228-5640, ext. 3

Responsibilities
Located on Maryland's Eastern Shore, the Dorchester Soil Conservation District assists farmers, poultry producers, and other landowners in the wise management of our soil, water and related natural resources. Agriculture is the county's number one industry, with corn, soybeans, small grains, truck crops and poultry serving as the primary agricultural products.  The Choptank and Nanticoke rivers flank the district and are major tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. More than 60 percent of the farms in Dorchester County have a portion of their land in the Critical Area.  Developing Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans to help landowners comply with Critical Area requirements is a high priority for district staff and a major part of the work load. District staff also assist with the design and installation of best management practices to improve water quality, including grassed filter strips, waterways, animal waste storage structures and poultry composters. Technical assistance is also provided for wildlife enhancement programs, erosion and sediment control plans for forestry projects and urban development, soil surveys, wetlands projects and the Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program. Additionally, the district promotes and implements Maryland's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program and several USDA programs, including the Conservation Reserve Program, Environmental Quality Incentives Program and Wildlife Habitat Incentives Program.

2005 Priorities
1. Assist farmers in complying with the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998, while developing Soil Conservation and Water Quality Pans for farms in the Critical Area and priority watersheds.

2. Provide farmers in the Nanticoke and Choptank watersheds with planning and assistance to manage nutrients.

3. Work with Maryland Cooperative Extension to educate poultry producers on the advantages of nutrient management.

4. Develop strategies to reduce agricultural nonpoint-source pollution in the Choptank and Lower Shore Tributary basins.

5. Provide landowners with information on land-use and management issues, review sediment and erosion control plans and stormwater management plans for county agencies.



Frederick Soil Conservation District

92 Thomas Johnson Drive, Suite 230 North Amber ?Frederick, MD 21702
(301) 695-2803, ext. 3

Responsibilities
The Frederick Soil Conservation District serves all of Frederick County, except the area west of the Catoctin Mountains. Dairy operations are predominant in the region, but there are also substantial beef, poultry and grain farms in the area. Developing Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans, stream buffer protection programs and manure storage facilities are primary functions of the Frederick Soil Conservation District's technical staff. While agriculture is still the largest industry in the area, there is substantial urban development in and around Frederick City, Walkersville, Mount Airy, Thurmont, Urbana, Buckeystown and Adamstown. Consequently, the district now has the growing responsibility of reviewing erosion and sediment control plans, addressing urban growth issues, and protecting open space. The Frederick Soil Conservation District shares office space and staff with the Catoctin Soil Conservation District.

2005 Priorities
1. Target sub-watersheds to implement nutrient reduction strategies for the Tributary Teams and state-established priority watersheds.

2. Complete Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans for farms with highly erodible fields in accordance with the Farm Bill.

3. Help Maryland farmers comply with the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998.

4. Promote the use of winter cover crops to tie-up unused nutrients.

5. Continue to review erosion and sediment control plans and improve communication with the county on urban development issues.
 



Garrett Soil Conservation District

1916 Maryland Highway, Suite C ?Mountain Lake Park, MD 21550 ?
(301) 334-6951

Responsibilities
The Garrett Soil Conservation District is the western most district in Maryland. The topography of the region varies from gently rolling upland to steep slopes and rugged stream valleys. Agriculture and recreation are the county's two chief industries. Construction, timber, coal mining and light manufacturing are also important to the local economy. Part of the district drains into the Chesapeake Bay by way of the Potomac River, while another portion drains into the Mississippi River via the Youghiogheny River. A Maryland scenic river, the Youghiogheny is the only river in the state designated as "wild." Water quality is a primary concern for both watersheds. A top priority for the district is to integrate the nutrient management plan requirements of the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998 with the development of Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans (SCWQPs). The district is quite involved in the urban area and is responsible for reviewing and approving erosion and sediment control plans, small pond approval and maintaining three flood control dams.

2005 Priorities
1. Assist landowners in meeting the nutrient management requirements of the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998.

2. Develop a strategy for the Southern Youghiogheny Watershed to increase the use of best management practices to protect water quality.

3. Target landowners in need of agricultural planning assistance.

4. Continue to promote conservation.  Encourage landowners to seek and implement a Soil Conservation & Water Quality Plan.

5. Implement Maryland's Tributary Strategies.
 



Kent Soil Conservation District

122 Speer Road, Suite 4 Chestertown, MD 21620
(410) 778-5150, ext. 3

Responsibilities
The Kent Soil Conservation District serves a primarily rural agricultural region. Grain and vegetable operations, dairy farms, poultry farms and nurseries comprise the agricultural makeup of the area. Bordered on three sides by water and boasting 70 miles of tidal shoreline, the district is involved heavily in protecting the county's water resources.  District staff work with landowners and farmers to develop Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans outlining best management practices (BMPs) needed to maintain agricultural production and minimize downstream water quality problems.  Major BMPs installed by the district include structural practices such as grassed waterways, grade stabilization structures, cropland terraces, and animal waste storage structures. Non-structural practices used to control erosion and manage nutrients include crop rotation, residue management and the planting of winter cover crops to tie-up excess nutrients.

2005 Priorities
1. Promote and direct conservation efforts toward MD Priority Watersheds and continue to assist with Maryland's Tributary Strategies.

2. Promote MD's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program.

3. Coordinate the Envirothon program for high school students.

4. Promote the Environmental Quality, CSP, AMA and Wildlife Habitat Incentives programs.

5. Continue to promote and provide application assistance for the Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program.

6. Help farmers develop and implement Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans and Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans.

7. Help farmers comply with the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998.

8. Educate young people and the general public about conservation.



Montgomery Soil Conservation District

18410 Muncaster Road  Derwood, MD 20855
(301) 590-2855

Responsibilities
Many Marylanders envision Montgomery County as an urban center, but fully one third of the county—some 99,000 acres—is comprised of agricultural land. More than half of this acreage is made up of cropland, with 23,000 acres devoted to pastureland. Fruits, vegetables, flowers, Christmas trees and sod are among the county’s leading agricultural products. Promoting stewardship of the county’s natural resources is a main focus of the district’s efforts. This is achieved primarily through the development and implementation of comprehensive Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans (SCQWP) for the county’s agricultural lands. In addition, the district works with Maryland Cooperative Extension to help farmers and others comply with the requirements of the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998. On the urban front, the district provides homeowners with technical assistance to correct drainage problems, reviews stormwater management ponds for local municipaities and conducts a variety of conservation education programs.

The District will also be involved in implementing a new county ordinance which requires every horse operation with 10 or more horses to have a SCWQP.


2005 Priorities

1. Develop Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans to provide guidance for farmers, especially within the equine industry.

2. Continue to deliver technical assistance and promote the MD Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program and USDA Incentive programs to assist farmers in implemementing conservation practices.

3. Deliver a variety of public education and otreach programs to promote a better understanding of and appreciation for the importance of agriculture in Maryland.

4. Provide support and agricultural input for the Tribuatary Strategy effort and the Montgomery County Water Quality Advisory Committee.

Newsletter, December 2004
Newsletter, June 2004 



Prince George's Soil Conservation District

5010 Brown Station Road, Suite 195 ??Upper Marlboro, MD 20772
(301) 574-5162, ext. 3

Responsibilities
Bordered by the Patuxent River in the east, the Potomac River in the west and Washington, D.C., Prince George's County is a mix of urban and agricultural areas. The majority of the county's 1,000 agricultural operations are located in the southern region. Currently, some 430 Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans (SCWQPs) are in place on these lands. Developed by district technical staff, these plans feature a wide range of best management practices to safeguard water quality, control nutrient movement, prevent soil erosion and protect wetlands. The Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998 requires nutrient management plans for all Maryland farms. These plans will need to be integrated with SCWQPs. Urban growth areas are located mainly in the northern section of the county and along the Washington, D.C. border. The district's primary urban concerns include erosion and sediment control plan reviews and dam safety approvals for stormwater management ponds. The district was recently given the responsibility to administer the county's Ag. Land Preservation Program.

2005 Priorities
1. Help farmers implement and maintain conservation practices required by the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998 and other programs such as CREP and EQIP.

2. Implement Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans for farms in priority watersheds.

3. Provide timely reviews of soil erosion, sediment control and stormwater management plans.

4. Administer the county Ag. Land Preservation Program.

5. Promote Maryland's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program to protect water quality.

6. Secure a long-term solution to office space needs.
 





Queen Anne's Soil Conservation District

505 Railroad Ave., Suite 3 ??Centreville, MD 21617
(410) 758-3136, ext. 3

Responsibilities
Located on Maryland's Eastern Shore, Queen Anne's Soil Conservation District serves a predominantly agricultural region. Corn, soybeans and small grains are the primary agricultural products. Vegetable, poultry, beef, dairy and swine operations comprise the remaining agricultural makeup of the area. The district provides a comprehensive education and information program directed toward all citizens—both urban and rural—which looks at human impacts on the environment and how people can lessen those impacts. Due to the explosive growth of the Kent Island area, the district's urban responsibilities have multiplied dramatically in recent years. Consequently, the district now has the growing responsibilities of reviewing erosion and sediment control plans, approving stormwater management plans and addressing urban growth issues.

2005 Priorities
1. Service all field requests in a timely manner.

2. Continue to promote agricultural waste management systems, the Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program and the Environmental Quality Incentives Program.

3. Help farmers implement best management practices required by the Farm Bill.

4. Update Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans that are more than five years old.

5. Provide a comprehensive information and education program for all citizens of Queen Anne's County.

6. Promote MD's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program.

7. Help landowners comply with the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998.
 





St. Mary's Soil Conservation District

22660 Washington Street ??Leonardtown, MD 20650
(301) 475-5856, ext. 3

Responsibilities
St. Mary's Soil Conservation District promotes the wise and efficient use of the county's soil and water resources. This is accomplished through a cooperative working relationship between county, state and federal agencies. Goals and objectives of each agency are then implemented at the district level. The district's primary goal is to help farmers plan and implement best management practices (BMPs) on their farms. This leads to healthier, more productive farms, which, in turn, help St. Mary's maintain its rural character. Working with landowners to stabilize eroding shorelines and create new wetland habitat is another important district function. An integral component of this effort involves educating and informing farmers about the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP). On the urban front, the district has an important program involving the review and approval of erosion and sediment control plans, stormwater management plans, pond designs and forest harvest sediment control plans. Educating the public on the importance of conserving valuable soil and water resources is an ongoing feature of both the agricultural and nonagricultural programs.

2005 Priorities
1. Prepare Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans and implement best management practices on agricultural land.

2. Review and approve stormwater management designs and erosion and sediment control plans for urban development.

3. Install non-structural shore erosion control practices and promote marsh creation projects on public and private lands.

4. Expand the District information and education program to reach more youth and non-traditional agricultural producers.


 



Somerset Soil Conservation District

30730 Park Drive ??Princess Anne, MD 21853
(410) 651-1575, ext. 3

Responsibilities
The Somerset Soil Conservation District is located in the southernmost region of Maryland's Eastern Shore. Broilers, corn, soybeans, vegetables, swine and dairy operations comprise the agricultural makeup of the area. Because of its agricultural productivity, Somerset County is ranked among the top 100 agricultural counties in the United States. Developing Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans to protect the environment and implementing the Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program are chief priorities for the district's technical staff. Additionally, district staffers are involved in planning and implementing strategies to reduce agricultural nutrients in Lower Eastern Shore watersheds as part of the Chesapeake Bay's Tributary Strategies. Drainage is also a major concern for district staff. Many of the streams and rivers in the county are tidal, and approximately two-thirds of the soils have impeded drainage. Moreover, only about ten percent of the county's soils can be farmed without artificial drainage. Helping farmers maintain good drainage has been, and continues to be, a major concern for the Somerset District.

2005 Priorities
1. Develop and update Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans in priority watersheds, critical areas and county-wide.

2. Provide technical assistance to landowners and cooperators receiving Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program funds to install best management practices.

3. Help the county minimize the impact of development pressures on agriculture, the environment and water quality.

4. Help farmers protect water quality and improve crop production by promoting controlled drainage in existing drainage areas.

5. Help landowners comply with the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998.

6. Promote conservation education programs.
 





Wicomico Soil Conservation District

2322 B Goddard Parkway ??Salisbury, MD 21801
(410) 546-4777, ext. 3

Responsibilities
The Wicomico Soil Conservation District serves both an agricultural and urban region on Maryland's Eastern Shore. Poultry, grain and vegetable operations comprise the agricultural makeup of the area. Providing farmers with technical and financial assistance to install best management practices to protect the environment is a main focus of the district's technical staff. The Pocomoke, Wicomico and Nanticoke Rivers—all tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay—are part of a tributary cleanup program designed to reduce nutrients entering the Bay. Additionally, the Upper Pocomoke Watershed has been designated as a special water quality project targeted for technical assistance. Although agriculture remains the primary land use within the district, a growing urban and industrial center continues to flourish in the Salisbury area. Consequently, the district now devotes a substantial amount of time and resources reviewing sediment and erosion control plans. Providing educators, students and the general public with information on soils, wetlands, land use policies and other educational services is also a major function of the district's staff.

2005 Priorities
1. Promote and install best management practices to reduce nutrient pollution using the MDA Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program, Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program and Conservation Reserve, and Environmental Quality Incentives Programs and Agricultural Management Assistance Programs.

2. Provide technical assistance to help landowners comply with the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998.

3. Target the Upper Pocomoke Watershed for installation of BMPs; support a water quality monitoring project.

4. Review erosion and sediment control plans in a timely manner.

5. Assist landowner groups interested in organizing public drainage associations.

 





Worcester Soil Conservation District  

304 Commerce Street ??Snow Hill, MD 21863 ??
(410) 632-5439, ext. 3

Responsibilities
The Worcester Soil Conservation District is located on the southern tip of Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Worcester County is unique because it drains to both the Chesapeake Bay and the inland bays of the Atlantic Ocean. The region is strongly influenced by the poultry industry, with cash grain farms also comprising a large portion of the agricultural market. The Pocomoke River provides drainage to four of the top 30 priority watersheds for pollution potential to the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland. Development pressures in the coastal areas have increased over the past several years. The district’s urban responsibilities now include the review and approval of erosion and sediment control plans for county and municipal construction projects. On the farm, district staff work to develop Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans to protect natural resources and farm profitability. The district promotes the Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program, which has been widely used by farmers to help cover the costs of water quality improvement projects. District staff are also involved in developing shallow water wildlife areas to help protect this environmentally-sensitive area. Additional priorities include implementing a shoreline stabilization and coastal dune maintenance program, promoting the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program and helping farmers comply with the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998.

2005 Priorities
1. Continue to provide Soil Conservation and Water Quality Plans for farms throughout the county. Help landowners comply with the Water Quality Improvement Act of 1998.

2. Promote the Maryland Agricultural Water Quality Cost-Share Program to help farmers pay to install water quality improvements.

3. Participate in and implement aspects of the Maryland Coastal Bays Program, the Lower Eastern Shore Tributary Strategy Team, Environmental Quality Incentives Program, Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program and Wetland Reserve Program.

4. Continue to promote conservation programs, including integrated crop management.